How To's and Why Not's, Off the Beaten Path Series, Travel Destinations & Stories

Geo-What? What is Geocaching, and How Does it Work? Bringing Free and Family Fun Together.

Geocaching is something we’ve done with our kids since they were young! Let us help you understand what it is, and we’ll guarantee you’ll love it as much as your kids do. 

ge·o·cach·ing — ˈjēōˌkaSHiNG 

It occurred to us one day while speaking with someone that many people still don’t know what this incredibly fun activity is. And the most fun part is, in these unpredictable times of 2020 and 2021, you can absolutely get out and do this while social distancing. 

What is Geocaching?

“Geocaching is a real-world, outdoor treasure hunting game using GPS-enabled devices (or phone – though I have confirmed the phone is not as accurate and can make this harder). Participants navigate to a specific set of GPS coordinates and then attempt to find the geocache (container) hidden at that location.” There are millions of geocaches hidden around the world—there are probably some near you right now. You probably walk right by them every day. Which is the object of this! They are hidden and unless you know they are there, they are not seen. Sometimes under a rock, inside a tree, under a bush, inside a bird feeder, or under a bridge. The possibilities are endless. 

How We Got Started

We started Geocaching when our youngest daughter was about 5 (she is 24 now). Our girls didn’t spend much time in front of the TV, and video games were pretty expensive. I (Stacy) was a stay-at-home mom for 12 years, and funds were limited, so we learned about Geocaching. A free worldwide scavenger hunt. Who doesn’t like a scavenger hunt? It gets you outside exploring new and different areas. With the technology the way it is today, it’s gotten much easier for families to join, and yet so many of our friends look at us funny when we say we went Geocaching for the afternoon. 

More Information

There is a lot of information out there about this fun activity, but basically, you sign up on their website. It’s free, but they do have a $30-a-year premium membership you can purchase. Which gets you even more caches in your area. You can download their free app on all phones and enter your current location and search. Try it … just for fun, to see how many caches are in your area! Chose any geocache from the list and get information on that cache. If you want to search for it, you would enter into your GPS device the location coordinates, and your handheld GPS (or phone) will lead you to the cache. Our family likes medium, large or extra-large caches. These are typically Tupperware containers or ammo boxes full of “stuff” If you take something, the rule is to put something inside. There is always a logbook to sign and date, and make sure you “log our find” so the owner of the cache knows who was there. You physically sign the book and then log your find electronically online. 

What Are Trackables?

aka: “Travel Bugs” A trackable is a sort of physical geocaching “game piece.” You will often find them in geocaches. Each Trackable is etched with a unique code that can be used to log its movements on Geocaching.com as it travels in the real world. Some of these items have traveled hundreds of thousands of miles thanks to geocachers who move them from cache to cache! 

They can be coins, dog tag types, or connected to a particular item like a key chain, small stuffed animal, etc. These are our favorites. Because we traveled so much in the military, we loved to take them from one state and move them to another.

Here are a few supplies we have. But really, just keeping a bin of fun little items is a great way to share the surprise!

I could go on and on about Geocaching, but there is much more information online for you. Go to www.geocaching.com to find out more. Get your kids involved! My kids are 33 and 24 and we still involve them in this fun outside activity. Now my oldest is a mom herself and loves Geocaching and soon my granddaughter will be running around looking for fun caches everywhere!

So get out! Download the free app on your phone and enjoy your time exploring!

Here are some more fun blog posts we think you’ll love!

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Off the Beaten Path Series

Off the Beaten Path in Mississippi. Our Top Hidden Gems

As full-time RV’ers, we travel and see a lot. This is part of our Opting Out of Normal series, where we explore the “Off the Beaten Path” of every state. We love the big popular stuff like everyone else, but there is just something incredible about discovering something unique, different, and maybe a little “off the beaten path.” We certainly can’t explore them all, but we’d love you to include your favorites below too. Each series will include at least one epic boondocking area, some complete with pictures and all with GPS coordinates. 

Ahhhh Mississippi! Have you driven the Natchez Trace Parkway? It’s 444 miles through 3 states with fantastic history and sights. We actually started in Tennessee and drove down to Mississippi. I have a detailed 3-part series – Click the button below.

Fun Facts about Mississippi

  • Kermit the Frog was born in Leland, Mississippi
  • It’s also where Elvis was born.

Windsor Ruins

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We found the story behind this absolutely fascinating. This was by far my favorite thing to see. I love castles, mysteries, and ruins. This was all of those! Windsor mansion was located on a plantation that covered 2,600 acres. The mansion was constructed between 1859 and 1861 for Smith Coffee Daniell II, who was born in Mississippi and had acquired great wealth as a cotton planter by age 30. In 1849, Smith Daniell married his cousin (interesting, huh?) Catherine Freeland. The couple had six children, with three surviving to adulthood. Much of the basic construction of the Windsor mansion was accomplished by Smith Daniell’s slaves. On April 28, 1861, Smith Daniell died at age 34, just weeks after the construction of the mansion was completed. 

The mansion stood from 1861 to 1890, when it was destroyed by fire. The mansion was never photographed in its completion. And to this day there have never been any known photographs found of the completed mansion. There is only someone’s drawing of it found many years later. Hummmm … makes you wonder! Really enjoyed visiting this site. Such mystery surrounding his death, the fire, no known photograph … just fascinating. The ruins are falling. Literally. So don’t miss this while you can still see this. It’s not far off the Natchez Trace, but don’t take your RV. Though it might be doable in a small one, if you have the choice, don’t do it.  The parking near this is small and hard to turn around if your RV is large. The huge oak tree on the property was massive!

The only regret we had … not bringing our drone to fly. We are very law-abiding, rule-following drone flyers, and it looks like you can freely fly your drone here, which had we brought it, we would have. 

We went exploring the Natchez area and got there just in time to see this riverboat take off! That was amazing and fun to see!

Cypress Swamp

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I think this was one of my favorite stops. This loop takes you through a pretty impressive but very short walk, Cypress Swamp. I didn’t realize just how unique and different Cypress trees grew. Though we were hoping to see an alligator, none seemed to be there while we were there.  

Sunken Trace

Make sure you stop at this! The trace appears sunken in this spot due to thousands of travelers walking on the easily eroded soil.

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This short trail will allow you to walk on the Natchez Trace just as thousands have before you. It was really a neat thing to see!

Rocky Springs Abandoned Town

This was another of my very favorite stops. We stayed in the Rocky Springs campground (see GPS coordinates below), so we could spend quite a bit of time here.

InstaRocky copy

This is an abandoned town. There isn’t much to see here in the way of structures or old town buildings. They have a couple of old safes still in the church, which had a sign out for the next gathering, so we have to assume it’s still an operational church which was super cool. The history of why this town perished is unfortunate and unique. Again, I don’t want to spoil it for you. We did quite a bit of research on the history of places on the Natchez Trace, but I tried not to read the stories before going. Only after. So that way, we could learn while we were standing right in front of it. For us, that makes it so much more exciting. 

French Camp

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We loved this stop! It’s a wide-open place where you can walk around the grounds, read the history, see and touch the old farm implements and you have to eat at the little restaurant (best potato soup ever!). We also learned there is a school there. Not a typical school but some sort of school where the kids live there. From listening, we understand it’s much like the “Hershey School” in PA. Also loved walking through the gift shops (there are 2). There is also a carriage house you can stay overnight in, and they have a wonderful bed and breakfast. Plan to spend a few hours here. It’s a great little community!

Children’s Museum

There is a wonderful Children’s Museum in Jackson. We did not stop there, but if you have children traveling with you, it comes highly recommended. It’s a bit on the pricey side from what I’ve seen, but definitely do some research on it. It looks like it’s a great place to spend a day!

Take A Tour of an Antebellum Home

Have you ever taken a tour of the antebellum homes in Natchez? We enjoyed a beautiful tour of a couple of them and found the historical stories really interesting. You can get information on all the homes at the welcome center in Natchez. 

Here are a few other blogs we think you’ll love!

Boondocking

Did you know you can stay at the welcome center in Natchez for two nights for free? We did it! Very friendly people at the visitors center, and they even have 20 and 30-amp hookups for us! Fresh water can be filled as you come (or leave) on the other side of the parking lot. GPS: 31.5543, -91.4131

  • Rocky Springs Campground (Natchez Trace Parkway) Hermanville, MS // GPS: 32.0868, -90.7994
  • Airey Lake Recreation Area // De Soto National Forest // GPS: 30.6892, -89.0611 We really enjoyed this area. Easy access camping, and aside from the one man who arrived on the motorcycle, clearly down on his luck and not real happy (about anything), we had a great time here. Loved the little lake, the ducks and the views were awesome, and our cell service was excellent!
  • POW Camp near Saucier, MS. See the pictures below (GPS info on the picture). Really unique history and a lake nearby.

So – You’re shopping on Amazon? I mean, who doesn’t, right? Please consider using our link. It doesn’t cost you anything extra, and it gives us a few extra pennies. Click below to use our link and then just shop like normal. Don’t forget ~ check out within 24 hours so we get credit! Thank you!! It really means a lot to us!

Thank you for stopping by our little corner of the internet! We truly appreciate each and every person who takes the time to read our blogs. We’re honored you spent the last few minutes with us!  If you aren’t signed up to follow us, please do! You’ll be notified of our new blogs when they go up. 

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Boondocking / Dry Camping, Off the Beaten Path Series, Travel Destinations & Stories

Off the Beaten Path in North Dakota

If this is your first time here – WELCOME! If not, welcome back!! As full-time RV’ers, we travel and see a lot. This is part of our Off The Beaten Path series where we explore the hidden treasures in every state. We love the big popular attractions like everyone else, however, there is just something incredible about discovering something unique and different. Our goals are to find the most unexplored places and take those roads less traveled. We certainly can’t explore them all, so we’d love you to share your own off-the-beaten-path stories with us. Each series will include at least 1 epic boondocking/free camping area, with GPS coordinates.


Traveling through North Dakota was really much like traveling through South Dakota. It’s hard not to fall in love with the hills and buttes that cover North Dakota’s landscape. From the Red River to Little Missouri and everywhere in between. We loved Theodore Roosevelt National Park. Since it’s more popular, we won’t go into all the things to see there, but definitely go!!

Lewis and Clark Riverboat

The Lewis and Clark Riverboat is a 40-foot flat-bottomed boat that departs from Bismarck and sails along the Missouri River every Summer. You can choose to just cruise the river and take in the landscape views from the water (definitely go at sunset), or opt for the food-filled dinner cruise option if you want to make a night of it.

Enchanted Highway

I think this has gotten more popular, but still, a really fun thing to see. Odd, but fun! One man’s quest to save his town with a trail of record-breaking sculptures. 

If you are traveling with young kids, I think they will love this highway! Located at exit 72, approximately 20 miles east of Dickinson via I-94, the Enchanted Highway is clearly marked by road signs and billboards with easy on-off access from the Interstate.

The International Peace Garden

This garden was intentionally grown where Manitoba Highway 10 becomes North Dakota Highway 3, because, it’s the longest north/south road in the world, symbolizing the connection between the United States and Canada. The Garden itself is dedicated to the harmony between the two nations. It spans 2,339 acres and can take up to two hours to drive through. But do it! Tip: There’s a 1.5-mile hike around the gorgeous Lake Stormon. This peaceful oasis is worth the hike. Quiet, and not many people do the hike.

Lake Metigoshe State Park

On the Canadian border, Lake Metigoshe State Park offers a well-rounded, classic lake with walleye fishing, a beach, clean cabins, a Fourth of July fireworks show plus some amazing kayaking if that’s your thing, with way less noise and crowds than you’ll find at big, better-known Lake Sakakawea.

St. Patricks Day Pub Crawl

This is a fun event put on each year. If you plan this right, you’ll have lots of fun! Running O’ the Green is an event in Jamestown where you dress up in green the Saturday before/after St. Patrick’s Day (check the calendar for the actual date) and run down a snow-covered hill to start off a pub crawl for charity. Fun and giving back! That’s perfect, right? If you want more information on this, I think YouTube has some videos on it. 

Abandoned Towns

Since we love photography, sometimes there is just something strangely beautiful about abandoned towns. And there isn’t a lack of those in North Dakota. Most of the ghost towns dwindled because of the railroad leaving, but so many buildings still stand in some towns. We simply like photography and history. Sometimes driving through these areas you can imagine the thriving town and wonder about the people who lived there. Schoolhouses, churches, and old homes – are dilapidated today. Definitely check them out if you’re curious! Check out Arena and Verendrye for sure!

Boondocking

North Carlson Lake – Douglas – GPS: 47.921023, -101.470419 Big rig friendly! Bathrooms and trashcans. Pretty nice little county park. 

DOUGLAS CREEK – GARRISON ND

Douglas Creek – Garrison GPS: 47.578242, -101.574641 Awesome big rig place, with amazing views, and great cell service! Awesome free CoE (Corps of Engineers) park!

Here are a few more blogs we think you’ll love!

So – You’re shopping on Amazon? I mean who doesn’t, right? Please consider using our link. It doesn’t cost you anything extra, and it gives us a few extra pennies. Click below to use our link and then just shop like normal. Don’t forget ~ check out within 24 hours so we get credit! Thank you!! It really means a lot to us!

Thank you for stopping by our little corner of the internet! We truly appreciate each and every person who takes the time to read our blogs. We’re honored you spent the last few minutes with us!  If you aren’t signed up to follow us, please do! You’ll be notified of our new blogs when they go up. 

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Off the Beaten Path Series, Travel Destinations & Stories

Off the Beaten Path in New Hampshire. Our Top Favorites!

UPDATED IN 2022As full-time RV’ers, we travel and see a lot. This is part of our Opting Out of Normal series where we explore the “Off the Beaten Path” of every state. We love the big popular stuff like everyone else, but there is just something incredible about discovering something unique, different, and maybe a little “off the beaten path”. We certainly can’t explore them all, but we’d love you to include your favorites below too. Each series will include at least 1 epic boondocking area, some complete with pictures, and all with GPS coordinates.

When traveling to New Hampshire, you definitely want to explore the more popular places, because in this small state, even those popular things are still unique and on those roads less traveled. Check out The Lost River Gorge and take a train ride on the Conway Railroad.

The Basin

This is located in Franconia Notch State Park in Lincoln. The Basin, a 30-foot-wide, 15-foot-deep bowl hewn from a torrent of rushing water pouring down the face of granite cliffs, is a geological masterpiece. Dating back to the Ice Age. Parking is accessible in both directions via exit 34A off I-93. A gentle, paved hike leads from the parking lot to The Basin itself. Dog friendly. There are 2 viewing areas. One is handicap accessible. The walk to the basin is less than 10 minutes and there is a parking area. Don’t miss the amazing Baby Flume waterfall as well. These are natural waterfalls created by the rushing waters of the Pemigewasset.

More incredible pictures from Franconia Notch State Park

Sculptured Rocks – Hebron

This narrow canyon has been carved by the river over thousands of years into spectacular and strange formations. A short walk from a back road near Newfound Lake, the wonders of the Sculptured Rocks geological site is not obviously apparent.

However, once standing next to the little canyon or atop the short bridge across, you can see the incredible shapes the river has carved in the rocks. After crossing the bridge, there are many trails to explore. Leave plenty of time as it’s definitely hard to stop taking pictures! There’s a sign next to the road and plenty of parking. On the way, there is one of the most beautiful lakes in New Hampshire, Newfound Lake. Make sure to save some time to visit this too!

Ruggles Mine, Grafton

Ruggles Mine State Park

(Update! I was told this place had closed so I did some research. It looks like there are new owners who plan to open it back up to the public at some point, and also I found several organizations who are doing “field trip” type tours here. If you’re interested, do some research and try not to miss this!). This place is just not something you can even describe. You have to see it! I see there are some great YouTube videos out there that people have done, so if you find this fascinating, make sure you watch some of those videos. At Ruggles Mine, you could quite literally find a hidden gem, since the mine is full of over 150 types of minerals. Even if you don’t, you’ll enjoy the stunning scenery. During certain times the floor of the mine will gather water, and that makes it even more scenic. 

Madame Sherri’s Castle

These are just ruins now, which we love to explore too. But once these ruins were the elaborate house where the enigmatic costume designer threw glamorous parties for New York’s theatrical elite. In New York, Madame Sherri made a name for herself designing elaborate costumes for Broadway productions, most notably the Ziegfeld Follies. After her husband’s death, she decided to build a unique structure in the woods of Chesterfield, New Hampshire, to hold parties for her theater friends.

TIP: The castle is near the entrance to the Madame Sherri Forest on Gulf Road. You’ll have to drive deep into the woods on dirt and stone roads, which may make you question whether you missed a turn. While the structures seem stable, be careful, as there are no handrails on the steps.

America’s Stonehenge, Salem

This mysterious man-made site features walls, chambers, and ceremonial sites that are over 4,000 years old! Some say that this is the oldest man-made construction in the U.S. I think the only downfall to this was the cost. If you’re a family going to see this, it’s not cheap. It was $12 per adult, children were $7.50 (under 5 were free). Really amazing history, but the cost seemed high to me! This is a unique, and different thing to see, but I don’t know that I’d go out of my way to see it. If you’re in the area, check it out!

Parkers Pancakes & Maple Barn

Located in Mason, NH. No visit to NH would be complete without some pancakes and homemade syrup! Located in Mason, Parker’s serves up pumpkin pancakes and maple coffee. The family business also runs a Sugar House and the Corn Crib Gift Shop. It’s a perfect way to spend the afternoon. 

Garwin Falls

Located in Wilton. Super short walk of just 0.1 miles one-way to upper falls; 0.25 miles one-way to the base of the main falls. If you’ve read any of my blogs before, you know that waterfalls are my happy place.

WOW! Just look at these falls!

I’ve said it before, they are the place where I feel the most at peace with everything around me. It’s where I feel centered and clear-minded. This is a beautiful short, easy walk and well worth the few minutes to get to the falls. Take your lunch! Enjoy a whole afternoon here. It’s really one of those off-the-beaten-path places you won’t regret. 

Story Land

(Sorry … no pictures of this place) Story Land is a theme park located in Glen, New Hampshire. In the few years prior to opening, the founders, Bob and Ruth Morrell had purchased a large number of dolls from Germany based on storybook characters. Unfortunately, I have had the fear of dolls passed up to me. Yes, UP! Our youngest daughter has a huge fear of dolls and so raising her made me look at them as a little more creepy than I had before having her, and therefore, I just don’t put myself in places where there are dolls. BUT with that being said, it’s super fun for kids, AND you get to stay in your RV in the parking lot FREE for a night or two. 

Here are a few other blogs we think you’ll love!

Boondocking

  1. Story Land Parking Lot (see above)
  2. Rochester Park & Ride – These seem to be a “thing” in NH. And at most you can spend the night at. Sadly, NH doesn’t seem to have a whole lot of disbursed camping, but these park and rides are actually pretty ok! This is big rig friendly, and GPS: 43.292794, -71.000173. 
  3. Walmart – any of them.

So – You’re shopping on Amazon? I mean who doesn’t, right? Please consider using our link. It doesn’t cost you anything extra, and it gives us a few extra pennies. Click below to use our link and then just shop like normal. Don’t forget ~ check out within 24 hours so we get credit! Thank you!! It really means a lot to us!

Thank you for stopping by our little corner of the internet! We truly appreciate each and every person who takes the time to read our blogs. We’re honored you spent the last few minutes with us!  If you aren’t signed up to follow us, please do! You’ll be notified of our new blogs when they go up. 

Amazon Affiliate disclaimer
Off the Beaten Path Series, Travel Destinations & Stories

Off the Beaten Path in Kentucky. Our Top 5 Hidden Gems!

As full-time RV’ers, we travel and see a lot. This is part of our Opting Out of Normal series where we explore the “Off the Beaten Path” of every state. Exploring the popular sights is something we love to do too, but there is just something incredible about discovering something unique, different, and maybe a little “off the beaten path”. We certainly can’t explore them all, but we’d love you to include your favorites below too. We love to “Opt-Out of Normal”. Each series will include at least 1 epic boondocking area, complete with pictures and GPS coordinates. 

Ahhhh Kentucky! One of the states we are sure we could spend a year in. We definitely will be going back. There is so much to see, and do! Who knew? Most of our finds listed are going to be nature finds (as that’s what we like to do). We know there is so much more in Kentucky to see. The whole state is just a hidden gem in our opinion. 

Grayson Lake / Grotto Falls (Hidden Falls)

Grayson Lake Kentucky

The scenery at Grayson Lake is just incredible. The sandstone cliffs, the waterfalls, the rare eagle flying overhead and if you love kayaking, this is candy for you! You’ll love this lake and the hidden falls you can only get into by a narrow short rock cave where you can paddle through a crack in the sandstone to go into a secret cove in the back, where you’ll think you’ve left one world for another. It’s magical and unbelievable.

Grayson Lake, KY

 By far our favorite place in Kentucky (so far). Also dropping onto Grayson lake are many waterfalls. We kayaked so much of the lake and I’d bet we passed 10 or more waterfalls just cascading off the side. It’s just amazing!


John A Roebling Suspension Bridge

This might not be considered off the beaten path, but it’s just a really amazing part of our US history not to mention a beautiful bridge!

John A Roebling Suspension Bridge

This bridge spans the Ohio River between Cincinnati, Ohio, and Covington, Kentucky. It opened on December 1, 1866. If you happen to be near it, or if you just like bridges, check it out.

Angels Window Trail

Double Arch Angels Trail Kentucky

Located in Daniel Boone National Forest. This is a phenomenal almost virtually unknown little gem. The bigger more popular arches here always win. From the forest service site: Angel Windows Trail begins at the Parched Corn Overlook off KY 715. The trail extends along a wooded ridge that leads under a high cliff to Angel Windows – two small arches clustered together at the end of the cliff. You will pass a number of overhangs and continue along the ledge. The official trail ends here, where there are some lovely views of the cliffs. Just beware of the drop-off to the right as you go past Angel Windows and use caution when exploring the area. Angel Windows Trail is located in the Red River Gorge in the Cumberland District of the Daniel Boone National Forest. 

The Ghost Ship

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Ghost Ship in Petersburg KY

Abandoned in Petersburg, Kentucky, the ship that is now a favorite destination for kayakers was once an award-winning navy ship that served proudly during both world wars.  Fun Fact: It served as the backdrop in a Madonna video (if you’re old enough to know who she is Ha!). So how did this vessel end up abandoned in the river? I’m going to leave you to experience this! This is definitely a fascinating thing to see. If you’re looking for something different, definitely check this out. 

Mantle Rock

mantle rock, Kentucky

A very large natural sandstone bridge. Spanning 180 feet and 30 feet high, Mantle Rock is an impressive natural sandstone bridge. A very short hike from the parking area. It’s definitely something easy to access and it’s one of those formations that make you not quite understand gravity as you know it. 

I know first hand there are many more amazing things to do and see in Kentucky. Make sure you check out Mammoth Cave and all of the Red River Gorge hikes and rivers and cliffs and arches. There are so many! They are more populated and can get pretty busy in the Summer, but if you want to discuss some other areas that aren’t necessarily off the beaten path, send us a message and we’ll try to steer you in the right direction. Or … we’ll meet you there! We do plan to go back to Kentucky at some point in 2019. We’d love to hear your hidden gems in Kentucky too!

Boondocking

Ask any questions you need regarding the boondocking area shown. I’m including a map with GPS coordinates. 

(Daniel Boon National Forest Boondocking)

Paragon, KY boondocking
Boondocking in Kentucky

Thank you so much for visiting our little corner of the internet. We appreciate each and every one of you! Let us know where your favorite hidden gems are in Kentucky. We’d love to hear from you!

Here are a few other blogs we think you’ll love!

So – You’re shopping on Amazon? I mean who doesn’t, right? Please consider using our link. It doesn’t cost you anything extra, and it gives us a few extra pennies. Click below to use our link and then just shop like normal. Don’t forget ~ check out within 24 hours so we get credit! Thank you!! It really means a lot to us!

Amazon Affiliate disclaimer

Boondocking / Dry Camping, Off the Beaten Path Series, Travel Destinations & Stories

Off the Beaten Path in New York ~ The Best Hidden Gems!

If this is your first time here – WELCOME! If not, welcome back!! As full-time RV’ers, we travel and see a lot. This is part of our Opting Out of Normal series where we explore the hidden treasures in every state. We love the big popular attractions like everyone else, but there is just something incredible about discovering something unique, and different, and taking the road less traveled. We certainly can’t explore them all, but we’d love you to share your own off-the-beaten-path stories. Each series will include at least 1 epic boondocking area, with GPS coordinates.

If you’re visiting New York City, did you know there are still so many “off the beaten path” things to do and see there? Strange happenings in that city, I tell ya!

  • Marilyn Monroes Subway Grate
  • The Earth Room – why? It’s a 22-inch-deep layer of dirt spread across a 3,600-square-foot gallery space in the middle of Soho. Interesting
  • Don’t forget about the Ghost Busters Fire House 

But our favorite part of NY is not the city. Have you been to Upstate New York? I hope you look at New York a little differently after checking some of these places out. 

The Wild Walk

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If you have kids, or even if you don’t, you just have to experience this place!  There are 81 acres for nature lovers. (wheelchair accessible as well) Nestled 45ft up in the Adirondack Forest. What would it be like to live on a spider web, hanging on a thread above the forest? The Spider’s Web at Wild Walk is your chance to lay in wait or walk across a web woven above the ground. This place is a really fun place whether you are 8 or 80.

Watkins Glen State Park

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We’ve been here twice, and we’re pretty sure we’ll go back again. It’s one of our two favorite State Parks so far. It’s magical and the beauty is one of those unforgettable places. New York’s Finger Lakes region. The park’s lower part is near the village, while the upper part is open woodland. There are 19 waterfalls along its course.  I believe it’s a course of 2 miles. The gorge path winds over and under waterfalls and through the spray of Cavern Cascade. Rim trails overlook the gorge. If you haven’t visited this State Park, definitely put it on your list.

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Letchworth State Park

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This park holds a special place in our hearts. It’s where we decided to take the first step to change the life we were living, which led us to ultimately the sale our two homes and live and travel full-time in our RV.

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It’s where the picture of us was taken on our home page. We were fortunate enough to visit right as they made a decision and started demolition of the old train bridge over the waterfall. There are three large waterfalls on the Genesee River and as many as 50 other waterfalls. The deep gorge formed by the river, with rock walls rising up to 550 feet in places and which narrow to 400 feet across above the middle of the three falls, prompted the area’s reputation as the “Grand Canyon of the East”. OH, and in the Fall, I hear there is a hot air balloon launch over the waterfall. I would love to go back and see that!

Eternal Flame Falls

The Eternal Flame Falls is a small waterfall located in the Chestnut Ridge Park in Western NY. A small grotto at the waterfall’s base gives off a natural gas, which can be lit to produce a small flame. This flame is visible nearly year-round, although it can be extinguished and must occasionally be re-lit.

Lucifer Falls

Located in Robert H. Treman State Park, Lucifer Falls can be found in the rugged Enfield Glen gorge.

There is a paved trail and staircases built by the Civilian Conservation Corps members that lead you along the gorge, making the hike beautiful and not overly challenging. A hike that is especially beautiful in Fall (we visited NY in the Summer), take the Rim Trail to Lucifer Falls to see the water cascading down the face of the rock. Be sure to also check out the rest of the park while you are there if you have the time. It is perfect for an afternoon picnic or a full day trip.

The Boldt Castle

Another castle! Another sad story! If you have read our other blogs in this series you will know I love to seek out castles. They are hidden in our American history in almost every state. I love researching and reading the story behind it. Sadly, so far everyone I’ve read about seems to be a story of despair, death, and/or extreme sadness. The Boldt Castle in Alexandria Bay is no exception. In 1900, Mr. Boldt started building a 120-room, 6-story home for himself and his family. Including a drawbridge, Italian gardens, and even tunnels.

boldt castle3

There were approximately 300 men working on building this structure. In January 1904, tragedy struck. Boldt telegraphed the island and commanded the workers to immediately “stop all construction.”  His wife, Louise, had died suddenly. A broken-hearted Boldt could not imagine his dream castle without his beloved. Boldt never returned to the island, leaving behind the structure as a monument of his love. For 73 years, the castle and various stone structures were left to the mercy of the wind, rain, ice, snow, and vandals. 

(these are not my pictures. Boldt Castle does not allow even your own pictures to be published. These pictures were available for download on their website.)

Natural Stone Bridge and Caves

natural-stone-bridge
pottersville

Located in Pottersville. Bring good rubber-soled enclosed walking shoes to explore this self-guided (we love the self-guided tours since we love to just take our time through things like this) ¾ mile, mostly above-ground, natural stone step nature trail and experience up-close the unique marble features including potholes, grottos, gorge and mill site waterfalls. The massive stone bridge arch is the largest marble cave entrance in the east.

Additionally, New York is another state that I could write for 2 solid days about. And you’d still be reading next week. So we’ll end it here, but make sure you check out the Corning Glass Museum. We didn’t get a chance to go there, but it was on our list! Next time for sure!

Here are some more blogs we think you’ll love!

Looking for some RV camping suggestions in New York? Click the link below to see the amazing places we stayed!

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Off the Beaten Path Series, Travel Destinations & Stories

Off the Beaten Path in Kansas. Our Top Hidden Gems!

As full-time RV’ers, we travel and see a lot. This is part of our Opting Out of Normal series where we explore the “Off the Beaten Path” of every state. We love the big popular stuff like everyone else, but there is just something incredible about discovering something unique, different, and maybe a little “off the beaten path”. We certainly can’t explore them all, but we’d love you to include your favorites below too. Each blog post will have a link to our favorite free camping areas! Some will include pictures and all will include GPS coordinates and information.

I think everything in Kansas qualifies as “off the beaten path” since it’s such a rural, and unique state in itself. Don’t you think? Don’t let that fool you though! My gosh, there are some beautiful things to see in Kansas! Here are our picks. And I promise not to make a Toto reference. 

Rock City

Rock City is a park located on hillsides overlooking the Solomon River in Ottawa County, Kansas. It’s just over 3 miles south of Minneapolis, Kansas. Rock City claims that there is no place else in the world with so many huge concretions. I think it’s eerie and fascinating. Rock City does have a very small admission fee of about $3 or $4. Well worth it. 

Table Mound Hiking Trail

This is an out and back hike, of just under 3 miles one way. If you choose not to do the whole thing, you are still going to see some fascinating views.

From scenic overlooks to a drop-down into a crack in the rocks. This isn’t a super hard hike but there are some rock scrambles. You’re going to see some pretty amazing rock formations on this hike.

Slide Cave – Kanopolis State Park

This entire state park is worth seeing. But definitely check out some of the caves in the park. 

Geary Lake Falls – Junction City, Kansas

Bet you didn’t know there were waterfalls in Kansas.

There are actually quite a few. A secret hideaway for those hot summer days, this waterfall is only active after a bit of rain. There are few waterfalls in Kansas. And this one is not publicized. On most days you can take in the waterfall all for yourself.

Cedar Bluff Reservoir

Located in Ransom, KS. Incredible views! Atop the bluff, visitors can see for miles in all directions and can walk right to the edge of the bluff. It’s quite the drop to the shoreline below.

There is a small circle turnaround at the top of the bluff for parking. The walk to the edge of the bluff is very short and I think accessible by wheelchair. Also, the state park nearby offers excellent camping, both for RVs and tents alike, whether for group or solo excursions. Well worth a quick stop!!

Castle Rock Badlands

Just about an hour away from the below Monument Rocks National Landmark. We highly recommend this area, but it is very fragile. Please be respectful and careful! A little history – In 2001, a large portion of the tallest spire fell after a thunderstorm, taking ten feet off the overall height.

All that remains of the fourth spire is a stub on the west end. The wind and rain that formed this geological wonder are still eroding today. Human interaction has accelerated the process as well. Just south of Castle Rock are the Castle Rock Badlands. The badlands consist of steep crevices and hoodoos leading off a large ridge. They are fragile as well, with one of the hoodoos known as Cobra Rock collapsing in 1998. Like Castle Rock and nearby Monument Rocks, the Badlands are comprised of Niobrara Chalk and shale.

Monument Rocks National Landmark

I’ve had some people tell me this isn’t such a hidden gem in Kansas. I disagree, but I am also not a local. So I’m including it. Please don’t climb on or write on these amazing rocks. We’d love to have this available for everyone to see. Please Note: Monument Rocks is located on private property. The owners graciously allow any and all to come to visit this wonderful landmark. Near Oakley, Kansas, Monument Rocks are large chalk formations that stand up to 70 feet high and look as though they were arranged by human hands. From US Route 83 south of Oakley, turn east onto Jayhawk Road at the Monument Rocks sign, go 4 miles east, then 2 miles south on Gove County Roads 14 and 16. These roads for the most are gravel, but good.

Here are some more blogs we think you’ll love!

Thank you for coming and reading our favorite hidden gems in Kansas. Have you explored Kansas? Did you find a fun, hidden gem of your own? We’d love to hear about it! Please leave your comments below.

Looking for the best free camping in Kansas? Here’s a link to some great boondocking locations we found!

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Boondocking / Dry Camping, Off the Beaten Path Series, Travel Destinations & Stories

Off the Beaten Path in Washington. Our Top Hidden Gems!

As full-time RV’ers, we travel and see a lot. This is part of our Opting Out of Normal series where we explore the “Off the Beaten Path” of every state. We love the big popular stuff like everyone else, but there is just something incredible about discovering something unique, and different. Taking that road less traveled has been our favorite way to travel. We certainly can’t explore them all, but we’d love you to include your favorites below too. Each blog post will include a link to the free camping areas we loved so much. complete with pictures and GPS coordinates. You definitely have to visit popular places like Olympic National Park and Mount Rainier National Park while in Washington. But we have some unique, off-the-beaten-path experiences you might want to check out too. 

Deception Pass

We really love State Parks. Most are just completely overlooked, unpopulated, and amazing. Deception Pass State Park is beautiful! Highly recommend checking it out. If beaches are your thing, you’ve hit the jackpot! You can also take a whale watching tour. Absolutely incredible.

Maryhill Museum and Stonehenge

stonehenge-944644_1920

An odd museum and Stonehenge replica in rural Washington State. Sam Hill was a Quaker and used his money to organize and fund a Quaker utopian community on the banks of the Columbia River in the early 1900s. Unfortunately, no Quakers besides Hill ever moved there and his utopian vision failed after a few short years. Nonetheless, Hill continued with the construction of a French Mansion on a cliff overlooking the Columbia River. From Portland, Oregon, take I-84 east through the Columbia River Gorge for about 70 miles. Cross the river at The Dalles (the pink bridge) and continue east on state route 14 for another 20 miles

Stonehenge in Washington

Palouse Falls

Located in Lacrosse. Unless you know what they’re looking for, hikers are unlikely to simply stumble upon the nearly hidden Palouse Falls. This is a 1.2-mile loop trail hike, pretty easy. You can actually see the falls from the parking area if you don’t want to do the hike.

The state park offers three distinct views of the falls. The lower viewpoint provides a direct view; it is reached by a set of steps from the main day-use area adjacent to the parking lot. The second, at the end of a paved interpretive path, tells the story of the secluded canyon. Both the interpretive path and gravel secondary parking area lead to the third and highest viewpoint, the Fryxell Overlook, offering panoramic views of the falls and Palouse River Canyon. Don’t miss this! It’s awesome!

Beacon Rock

Located in Stevenson – A truly unique experience to do. The location is on State Route 14 about 35 miles East of Vancouver.

Today, visitors of Beacon Rock State Park use the unique trail system to easily traverse the rock’s steep ledges to its peak overlooking the Columbia River Gorge.  The rock is also open for climbing year-round.

Gravity Hill

Have you seen or experienced these across America? While traveling we’ve realized there are several places in the US that have a gravity hill phenomenon. This gravity-defying road is not easy to find. Located on a stretch of North Crosby Road about 10-15 miles north of Prosser, the road’s just down the street from an old (said to be haunted) grain elevator. Luckily, there’s a start line painted on the pavement so you’ll know where it is.

Snoqualmie Falls

Snoqualmie is a city next to Snoqualmie Falls in King County, Washington. It is twenty-five miles east of Seattle. Who knew you could be so close to a city and see this? 

If you’re in Seattle, definitely check out the Center of the Universe Sign. No one has been able to determine if this is actually the center of the universe, so the sign stays. Just a fun thing to see. 

Speaking of Seattle! Did you see our blog about our visit to Seattle? We were lucky enough to be able to hang out in a friend’s yard with full hook-ups in our RV! I know you’re here to see the quiet hidden gems in Washington, but if you wanted to venture to the more popular things, check out our Seattle blog post here!

The Nutty Narrows Bridge

Do you like squirrels? Yes, I said Squirrels! The Nutty Narrows Bridge in Longview was constructed in 1963 by a local builder, the late Amos Peters, to give squirrels a way to cross Olympia Way, a busy Longview, Washington, thoroughfare, without getting flattened by passing cars.

Here are some other blogs we think you’ll love!

Click the button below to see our best places for RV camping in Washington.

Thank you for checking out our little corner of the internet. There is so much beauty in Washington. Please share your hidden gems with us! We’d love to hear from you!

lasttime

So – You’re shopping on Amazon? I mean who doesn’t, right? Please consider using our link. It doesn’t cost you anything extra, and it gives us a few extra pennies. Click below to use our link and then just shop like normal. Don’t forget ~ check out within 24 hours so we get credit! Thank you!! It really means a lot to us!

Boondocking / Dry Camping, Off the Beaten Path Series, Travel Destinations & Stories

Off the Beaten Path in California. Our Top Hidden Gems

If this is your first time here – WELCOME! If not, welcome back!! As full-time RV’ers, we travel and see a lot. This is part of our Opting Out of Normal series where we explore the hidden treasures in every state. We love the big popular attractions like everyone else, but there is just something incredible about discovering something unique and different. And taking the roads less traveled. We certainly can’t explore them all, but we’d love you to share your own off the beaten path stories. Each post will have a link to our favorite boondocking (free) camping areas, plus reviews or information on paid and membership camping areas.

I (Stacy) was born, raised, and lived in California for the first 27 years of my life. I met the love of my life there, and at 27 we moved to VA for a few years. We moved a lot in our 20 years with the military but California will always be a part of me. Though I’m told I’ve lost my “California lingo/accent”. Funny, when we were in Germany on a train, someone asked me if I was from California. I knew then and there that we speak a little differently. Ha!

The amazing thing about California is within a few hours one way or another, you can be in the mountains, the desert, or the beach. There are amazing lakes, beautiful ski areas, and hot desert places to explore. 

Highway 1 – Pacific Coast Highway (PCH)

Though it’s not an unpopular thing to do if you ever get a chance to drive the PCH, do it! Down in Los Angeles County you’ll find houses hanging off the side of the highway which — may not be there forever.

As you head up toward San Francisco, you’ll find the most breathtaking views of the rocky coastline. Fun Fact: Highway 1 is one of the most filmed car commercial areas in the US. 

Bixby Creek Bridge

This is probably my favorite bridge in CA. Yes, even more than the Golden Gate Bridge. It reminds me of the “Bridge to Nowhere” which I have included in this blog too. The concept of building something like this into the rocky mountains of CA is just mind-blowing to me. This Bridge is on Hwy 1 which is such a spectacular drive. You can pull over and take pictures, have lunch, and just overlook the Pacific Ocean. 

Catalina Island

If you haven’t taken the boat trip out to Catalina Island, it’s a must! I’ve taken a boat out several times, and it’s a pretty popular thing to do, so I won’t go into details, but let me know if you have any questions.

The Sunny Jim Cave Store

seacave

This is the only entrance to any sea cave in California that you can access via land. The entrance is a narrow and dim tunnel that leads from the store to a staircase made of 145 incredibly wet and dark steps that descend directly into the sea cave. The narrow tunnel and cave walls are very colorful, due to the natural minerals and the effect the saltwater has on them. Address:  1325 Coast Blvd., San Diego 

Natural Bridges in Calaveras County

This is a relatively unknown swimming hole that will really make you feel like you have stumbled on a true gem! If you’re planning to stop here, bring a flashlight, or headlamp. That will help ensure you really get to experience this!

CAVEmemem

I would never recommend going on a weekend or during the summer months, or any long weekend. Unless you like to immerse yourself in people. We tend to do everything off-season and during the week. This is a busy place on weekends, but it’s still one of those very unpopular places. Bring your water shoes and if you like to float you can bring your “pool floats” but please remember to pack it in, pack it out. 

Heart Rock Falls

Heart Rock Falls

Carved by a waterfall this heart-shaped rock has inspired lovers for many years. A woodland hike of a mile round trip ends at a lovely waterfall, but if you don’t recognize the end of the trail by the waterfall, you definitely will when you see the heart-shaped rock. In fact, there are two heart-shaped pools on the side of the cliff where the waterfall hits. A few yards before you get to the waterfall, you’ll come across a massive, very old oak tree, seemingly to signify how old this place is,  A little further down the stream is a slide rock pool. From there you can backtrack up the stream to reach the base of the falls. 

Crowley Lake Columns

Located in Mono County – The giant plateau formation sits in one of the world’s most interesting volcanic areas. You know, our country and the rock formations tell such amazing stories.  Lava! It’s all about Lava! The columns are along the east side of Crowley Lake. Access roads are winding and sandy, four-wheel drive recommended. Walking inside these amazing columns is a feeling like no other. I hope they are standing for many more years. What a really neat part of our country!

Bridge to Nowhere

If you have followed my blogs, you know I love mysterious, strange things. You know, the things that make you go “huh?” So here’s a little strange one for you.

Near Mount Baldy, CA you’ll find the old, abandoned bridge.  The Bridge to Nowhere remains one of the most bizarre artifacts of the San Gabriel Mountains. During its initial construction, Los Angeles County claimed that the bridge and connected highway would be one of the most scenic roads in America. The food in 1938 washed out the entire road to the bridge, and it still makes me wonder with the expense of such a bridge, why not build the roads back up. But it remains a Bridge to Nowhere. It may have changed now, but I believe the only way in and out is to hike it. It’s a breathtaking, beautiful hike through rivers and streams, and a pretty amazing sight to see when you get there. 

McWay Falls and Waterfall House Ruins

This Big Sur waterfall drops 80 feet directly into the Pacific Ocean, and inspired the hillside house up top. Big Sur’s Julia Pfeiffer Burns State Park is renowned for its 80-foot McWay Falls and some of the most breathtaking views anywhere along the California coast. The story of how this property could have been owned by one family and then let go, is quite interesting in itself. I’ll leave the exploring to you! 

Point Reyes Shipwreck

Have you seen the shipwreck in Point Reyes? My first thought was “yeah, right, just behind a shopping area?” But once you read the history and walk out to the abandoned ship, you realize it a real deal.  Point Reyes shipwreck is perched on a sand bar off the shoreline of Tomales Bay. It is located in the small town of Inverness, just behind the grocery store. Easy access, no hiking required. 

shipwreck-2096945_1920

I’m definitely going to have to do a part 2 for CA. But make sure you check out Alcatraz and Morro Bay, and one of my all-time favorite places to visit and wander around is Solvang.

Also if you want to see something really over the top with an interesting story behind it, check out Hearst’s Castle. The views alone will make it worth it. But take the tour, and the bus trip up there is fun! We’ve actually done it a couple of times, and it’s really worth it. 

Mono Lake

Mono Lake is located East of Yosemite National Park. When you think of California, you don’t think of a place like this. They call it hauntingly beautiful for a reason!

Mono Lake is a saline soda lake in Mono County, California, formed at least 760,000 years ago as a terminal lake in an endorheic basin. The lack of an outlet causes high levels of salts to accumulate in the lake. These salts also make the lake water alkaline.

Wikipedia

Hope you enjoyed our ideas! Thank you so much for visiting our little corner of the internet. We would love to hear what you find “off the beaten path” in California. Check back often! We are always updating our blogs with new hidden gems!

Looking for the best boondocking or paid campgrounds to stay while you’re traveling in California? Check out our ever changing, always updating list! Click the button below to see our best RV Camping in California!

So – You’re shopping on Amazon? I mean who doesn’t, right? Please consider using our link. It doesn’t cost you anything extra, and it gives us a few extra pennies. Click below to use our link and then just shop like normal. Don’t forget ~ check out within 24 hours so we get credit! Thank you!! It means a lot to us!

Here are a few blogs we think you’ll love also!

Boondocking / Dry Camping, Off the Beaten Path Series, Travel Destinations & Stories

Bisti Badlands ~ New Mexico’s Most Hidden Gem

Bisti Badlands – AKA De-Na-Zin Wilderness Area

Have you heard of Bisti Badlands? Hardly anyone we talked to after we shared some pictures had not ever heard of this place. So it’s perfect! We love finding these hidden gems! We came upon the Bisti Badlands by complete mistake. What a beautiful mistake! We really strive to find and take the roads less traveled. Finding the “off the beaten path” places is always our goal. We enjoy and cherish the popular places, but finding, experiencing, and then sharing something unique and different is thrilling. 

Time and natural elements have etched a fantasy world of strange rock formations made of interbedded sandstone, shale, mudstone, coal, and silt here at the Bisti Badlands. The weathering of the sandstone forms hoodoos – weathered rock in the form of pinnacles, spires, cap rocks, and other unusual forms. Fossils occur in this sedimentary landform. 

We both agree this is truly the most unique and interesting place we’ve ever been. The rock formations made us feel as if we were on another planet. Surely not in the middle of New Mexico. We’re pretty sure this is how the moon must look.

The only way into this area is to hike from the parking lot / trailhead. There are no off-road vehicles allowed here. Not even bicycles. You can start to see some interesting formations about one and a half miles in. There are no marked trails. Below I will list some of the GPS coordinates from our hike to the best areas. There are more areas you can find but these are the most popular and most scenic areas. We hiked on a Saturday and saw hardly anyone out there. Hiking here, in our opinion, was very easy!! Very flat, and unless you want to climb, it’s not required to get to these areas. 

GETTING TO THE BISTI PARKING LOT

For now, (2019) you do need to follow these directions. If you come from the other way, the road is blocked. It was washed out at least a year or two ago and is still closed. Drive NM 371 just under 36 miles south of Farmington (from the San Juan River crossing) or just under 45 miles north of Crownpoint (from the intersection of 371 and Navajo Service Route 9), and turn east on Road 7297 (a gravel road). Travel down Road 7297 for approximately 2 miles to a T-intersection and turn left. Travel just under one mile to the Bisti Access Parking Area.

You’ll see a lot of petrified wood here. Which was Justin’s favorite. There are several petrified trees still intact just where they fell, or so we assume. You can still see the rings in the trees. It’s pretty impressive! We wondered how much was still to be uncovered under the land we are walking on. Just a mysterious and wonderful place!

BOONDOCKING / DRY CAMPING

There are several areas to dry camp down the gravel road before you get to the main parking lot. But if you have a big rig, our recommendation is to go all the way to the parking lot and stay there. Some of the dips to get to some of the pull-off areas were pretty steep for us. If you have a toy hauler and sit a little higher, you may be able to make it. We arrived on a Friday afternoon. Not usual for us. We like to do these sorts of things on weekdays. But even arriving on a Friday afternoon, there was plenty of room!

The parking area and road are located on BLM land. The hiking area of Bisti Badlands is Wilderness area. There is a difference in rules. 


THE LOW-DOWN ON DOGS

Dogs are allowed. And there doesn’t seem to be a leash law here. We actually didn’t see any dogs on leashes here so if you have a problem with that, leave your dog at home, or inside the RV if it’s cool enough. We are huge leash law supporters, so unfortunately our pup had to stay in the RV, as she is not other dog friendly. Also, watch your step, when dogs aren’t on leashes, owners aren’t paying much attention and therefore not cleaning up after their pups.

TIPS and INFORMATION

  • There are no facilities, come prepared.
  • This is a true wilderness area, there are no marked trails.
  • Bring lots of water. Especially if it’s hot. We visited in March, and the temps were just in the high 50s. Perfect for hiking in our opinion.
  • Good hiking shoes are a must. To see all the areas we did, you’ll hike more than 4 miles. We didn’t see everything, but if you wanted to, you could hike as much as 8 miles here. We saw so many people walking in with slip-on shoes and no water, and the closest thing you’ll see is still 1.5 miles in so even if you only go that far, that’s still 3 miles round trip. Please bring water, snacks, and wear the right shoes. 
  • Cell phone reception is spotty. Please do not rely on your cell phone for GPS coordinates. We use this handheld GPS (click here). If you don’t have a handheld GPS you will love it! Especially if you hike a lot, and also perfect for Geocaching! Don’t know what Geocaching is? Check out our blog here about Geocaching is, and how fun it is!
  • There is no shade, be careful when hiking in high temperatures. Again, if you have a choice, check this place out in Spring or Fall.
  • Check the weather before visiting. Roads and terrain may become impassible in wet weather. You can count on this place having flash floods for sure! When we arrived, everything was really dry, but the road to an apparently larger parking lot was washed out and closed. 
  • You can tent camp out in the wilderness. We think that would have been SO cool! 
  • No drones – I would have loved to get drone footage of this, but we are responsible drone owners and follow all the rules. 
  • No campfires.

OUR FAVORITE BISTI LOCATIONS

  • Main Parking Lot 36.25915, 1108.25179
  • Egg Garden (Alien Egg Hatchery) 36.2674, -108.22374
  • Stone Wings 36.279285, -108.237340
  • Log Jam 36.26803, -108.22173
  • Hoodoo City 36.26632, -108.21793
  • Bisti Arch 36.26863, -108.2261

We hope this helps everyone who wants to venture into this phenomenal place. I’m pretty sure that in our 2 years of traveling, this is the most unique and different place we’ve been.

If you’re heading to this amazing location, we would love to hear about your experience here! Let us know if you’ve been here! Also, let us know if we inspired you to put this on your bucket list!

Thank you for stopping by our little corner of the internet! We truly appreciate each and every person who takes the time to read our blogs. We’re honored you spent the last few minutes with us!  If you aren’t signed up to follow us, please do! You’ll be notified of our new blogs when they go up. 

Here are some other blogs we think you’ll love!

So – You’re shopping on Amazon? I mean who doesn’t, right? Please consider using our link. It doesn’t cost you anything extra, and it gives us a few extra pennies. Click below to use our link and then just shop like normal. Don’t forget ~ check out within 24 hours so we get credit! Thank you!! It really means a lot to us!

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