Boondocking / Dry Camping, Off the Beaten Path Series, Travel Destinations & Stories

Off the Beaten Path in Maine. Our Top Hidden Gems!

Lighthouses, beaches, and seafood come to mind when most people think about Maine. Of course, Maine is where you will also find the world’s largest telephone. I mean, who knew? 

By all means, go check out Bar Harbor and Acadia National Park. WOW! Unbelievable beauty! But with that being said, take a look at our list of unique things to see in Maine. 

Did you know that we traveled full-time in our RV for over 7 years? And did you know we’ve put together a list of hidden gems in every single state? So check out some of our other top picks and great places to explore in another state!

Monhegan

Monhegan is a small, rocky island ten miles from the nearest mainland and scarcely a square mile in area. It is accessible only by boat and there are no cars or paved roads on the Island.

Since long before the explorer John Smith visited it in 1614, it was known to Native Americans as a prime fishing area, though today its economy is more invested in tourism than it is in lobstering or fishing. The year-round population has seldom exceeded 65 in recent times. No drones. No smoking outside the village. It’s a very protected island, and when you visit, you’ll see why! To get there, take a nice relaxing ferry ride and with the entire island being only one square mile, you can wander around quite a bit before taking the ferry back. 

Don’t forget to check out the D.T. Sheridan Shipwreck while exploring this island. The steel hull of a wrecked tug rests on Lobster Cove on Monhegan Island’s rocky southeastern shore. 

State Parks! We love them. We have found the most amazing things to see in the virtually unknown, off-the-beaten-path state parks.

Wolfe’s Neck Woods State Park

wolfes-neck-park-2033099_1920

Wolfe’s Neck Woods State Park is a five-minute drive from the center of Freeport’s bustling shopping district. Definitely check out the Casco Bay Trail.

Small Falls

Located in Rangeley. Can you imagine a typical rest area that has a waterfall? And I mean a real, beautiful, backcountry type of waterfall area. Well, you’ve found one! Smalls Falls, with its scenic waterfall, colorful gorge, and fine swimming holes, welcomes all, often including visitors from all over New England. This may well be the most epic rest area ever!

Moxie Falls

The trail to Moxie Falls is fairly easy, but it will make you feel like you’re deep in the woods, surrounded only by nature.

It’s a 2-mile round trip trail. That’s the beauty of getting away from the tourist traps on the coast. You’ll see the beauty in its natural state, away from the crowds.

Moose Point State Park

We will repeat it – State Parks don’t get enough attention. This is a peaceful park that many people don’t know about; those who do can spend a day enjoying long walks on beautiful trails along the coast or woods and wildlife spotting.

The tide pools appeal to kids especially, where they can poke around and find small marine creatures under the rocks. It goes without being said, I’m sure, but please respect our beautiful nature and be kind and easy to our tide pool creatures.

Wire Bridge

Do you like Bridges? We do! The elaborate, the new, the old, the abandoned, and the unique and different ones. Wire Bridge in New Portland is no exception. This bridge may be the last wire-supported bridge of its type in the world. New Portland is about halfway between Bangor and the Canadian border. Only about 725 people live there, and every one of them could probably point you to their showpiece – the old Wire Bridge. 

Cutler Bold Coast Preserve

Cutler Coast Public Lands is a gorgeous place to visit with very few tourists. Many people love the quiet hiking trails with incredible views.  I’d venture to say that most hikers who come to visit Maine have never heard of the Cutler Coast. Their loss. And that’s why it’s one of our favorite hidden gems!

Rattlesnake Flume and Pool

from the wild

Plan for a hot day of hiking Blueberry Mountain in Evans Notch, and make sure you stop off at Rattlesnake Flume and Pond near the end. The crystal clear pool is located just off Stone House Trail. You’ll see a marker showing you the way via a small detour.

Giant’s Stairs (or Staircase)

giants staircase

Another beautiful lava-made scene. When the hot magma met the sea.  Over several million years the seam of basalt rock eroded into an oceanside cascade of ledges now known as the Giant’s Stairs.

In the town of Harpswell, the Giant’s Stairs are at the midway point of a fantastic, easy half-mile trail. You just gotta do this! You most likely will be all alone on the trail unless it’s a weekend. But still, this is a very unpopulated area. You’ll love it! 

Wild Blueberry Land

Did you read that twice? Ha! Yes – More of an unusual gem than a hidden secret, Wild Blueberry Land is dedicated to the state’s official fruit: the tangy blueberry. This small theme park is located in Columbia Falls, filled with blueberry-shaped statues.

The main dome-snapped building is filled with tasty treats, including freshly baked blueberry pies, muffins, cakes, sweets, loaves of bread, and more. There are fun things to do for kids, including mini-golf. Plus, there are some views of Acadia NP.

Stephen King’s House

If you’re a long-time fan of the author Stephen King, you’ll want to take a drive-by. He was born in Maine and has used the state as the setting for many of his stories.

Despite his fame and wealth, we are told that he still lives in his home state, in a rather distinctive mansion just outside of downtown Bangor. But don’t just go to Bangor to see King’s home! Bangor is really a great little town to visit too!

Boon Island Lighthouse

Boon Island lies approximately 6 miles off the coast of York, Maine, and is the tallest lighthouse in New England. Take a personal vessel from York Harbor on a clear day and simply aim for the tall lighthouse on the island, which is visible for miles. There is a darker, sad history of this island before the lighthouse was built in 1855. It’s well worth a day trip!

Here are a few other blog posts we think you’ll love!

Boondocking

Boondocking can be tough to find on the east coast. We know! But if you’re flexible in the location, you can certainly find some pretty epic places. 

  • Jewett Cove – Near Greenville, Maine. GPS: 45.687199, -69.551319 The road is gravel, and long (about 5 miles) but pretty well maintained. Beautiful lake you can launch a kayak or canoe from the boat launch. Sites are on the smaller side but you can still get a big rig in the areas if others are not parked strange. Cell service ok with Verizon. 
  • Big Eddy – Dead River – Long Falls Dam Road New Portland, Maine GPS: 45.230921, -70.195401 Another beautiful place that has recently been updated and looks fantastic. Big rig friendly
  • Another big rig friendly area, but beware of the low hanging trees. If at all possible, scout the road first!! Lakeside sites, beautiful and quiet. Bigelow Preserve – Stratton, Maine. GPS 45.173465, -70.411772

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Thank you for stopping by our little corner of the internet! We truly appreciate each and every person who takes the time to read our blogs. We’re honored you spent the last few minutes with us!  If you aren’t signed up to follow us, please do! You’ll be notified of our new blogs when they go up. 

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Off the Beaten Path Series, Travel Destinations & Stories

Off the Beaten Path in Georgia. Exploring Hidden Gems in Georgia!

Leaving Georgia in our rearview mirror was hard! We left with a longer list of things to see than we came with. We hadn’t done a ton of research on Georgia before visiting, and we should have because there was so much more to see and do! As we plan our 2020/2021 trip down the east coast, we are more excited than ever to go back. This blog will definitely be updated soon, but here are some amazing little hidden gems we found! You’ll want to stop and explore this state full of surprising experiences. Below are a few of our favorite places when taking the roads less traveled.

Providence Canyon State Outdoor Recreation Area

We had to mention this beautiful area. It may not be a hidden gem, but you really just have to check it out!

The gorgeous Providence Canyon, affectionately known as “Georgia’s Little Grand Canyon,” is one of Georgia’s most treasured locations. It’s even been touted as one of the state’s “Seven Natural Wonders,” which is totally weird because the canyon is not only far from “natural,” its creation was more blunder than wonder. Those exquisitely hued sediment walls are a product of inexperienced farmers making a colossal mess of things, and Mother Nature just kind of worked with it from there. 

Georgia Guidestones

guidestonesdiscover

Aside from waterfalls and slot canyons, we love mystery. Abandoned places that were due to some historical events or interesting situations. Or something strange that was just never “figured out”. Well, have you heard of the Georgia Guidestones? In June of 1979, a man going by the pseudonym of R.C. Christian approached the Elberton Granite Finishing Company with the task of building a monument. He said that no one would ever know his true identity or the group he represented. He seemed to have an endless supply of money to fund the project, and by the terms of the legal contract, all plans had to be destroyed after completion, and all information about him was withheld from the public. In 1980, the stones were finished. They carry a tablet in front proclaiming, “Let these be Guidestones to an Age of Reason.” Engraved in the stones are ten guidelines meant to re-establish the planet and society, perhaps after an apocalypse. They are written in eight different languages, English, Spanish, Swahili, Hindi, Hebrew, Arabic, Chinese and Russian. I’ll let you discover what the Guidestones say and whether it’s something you want to go see. Another one of those mysteries about the USA we are intrigued about. 

Toccoa Falls

Toccoa Falls

You knew there would be a few waterfalls in this post, right? Did you know the Toccoa waterfall is taller than Niagara Falls? This waterfall is easily reached, and make sure you pack a lunch! Such a beautiful place to just sit and eat your lunch and listen to the power of this waterfall. This waterfall is actually on the campus of Toccoa Falls College. The entrance is through their bookstore. The story behind the falls is quite sad and tragic. Read about it before you go. It might just make you appreciate it even more!

Toccoa River Swinging Bridge

Just a short 1/4 mile hike from the end of a fire service road in northern Georgia is the longest swinging bridge east of the Mississippi. They call it a swinging bridge, but they don’t always mention the bouncing. This is a 270-foot hiker’s bridge high up over the Toccoa River. The bridge is supported by simple anchoring at each end, with no towers or other supports in the middle, the weight is borne by the cables sloping down to the middle and back up again. Sure it swings from side to side, but it’s the up and down that makes it fun. Tip for getting there: Access the trail from the end of Fire Service Road 816, just east of Blue Ridge’s town- a short hike to the bridge. Campsites line the water under the bridge, and prime spots go fast. No reservations.

Starrs Mill

Located in Fayette County – A really fantastic part of history. We love the old mills when we’re able just to wander around.  During the mid 19th century, thousands of mills across the eastern United States took advantage of an endless supply of water power. With all the heavy recent rains, the water is flowing pretty good. Be careful! 

Starrs Mill

Anna Ruby Falls

Don’t mistake this for Ruby Falls in Tennessee.

Anna Ruby Falls

Which is amazing too! These falls are located in Unicoi State Park in White County near Helen, Georgia. Easy, paved half-mile trail. Once you drive through Unicoi Park you will enter forest service property and soon arrive at the Anna Ruby Falls Visitor Center. Here is where you pay your $3 recreation use fee (per person, 16 and older; free for kids under 16) and access the trailhead. So worth taking time to see this! Spring, summer, or fall, you’ll love this short, easy hike!

Okefenokee Swamp (see our 2022 update below)

When Justin mentioned checking out the Okefenokee Swamp, I thought it was a joke. I kept wondering how I’d heard this very nonsense word before. A movie? Help me out here people! I still don’t know where I’d heard this before. Cartoon? And then I realized it really is a real place. A really cool place!!! So off we went. We enjoyed an hour boat ride down part of the swamp. And learned that if you bring your own kayak, you can launch from right there at the adventure center for $5, or free if you have America the Beautiful pass. We also learned that again, it was a place we will have to come back to. I think sometimes we find these amazing things to explore, and while we are there, learn something else about the place we didn’t allow enough time to do. Yes we make our own schedule but we had already made plans to be in Florida at a certain time, so needless to say, it’s back on our list when we are in Georgia again. 

UPDATE! WE WENT BACK!!

We highly recommend this amazing place! It truly is a hidden gem, and if you are into kayaking, please take the time to venture out into the water. Our day of kayaking was amazing!

Thank you for stopping by our little corner of the internet! We truly appreciate each and every person who takes the time to read our blogs. We’re honored you spent the last few minutes with us!  If you aren’t signed up to follow us, please do! You’ll be notified of our new blogs when they go up. 

Looking for amazing RV camping locations in Georgia? We’ve got some great suggestions! Click the button below to see where we stayed!

We’d love to hear about your favorite places to explore in Georgia. Comment below so we can add some hidden gems to our list!

Here are a few more blogs we think you’ll love!

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How To's and Why Not's, Off the Beaten Path Series, Travel Destinations & Stories

Geo-What? What is Geocaching, and How Does it Work? Bringing Free and Family Fun Together.

Geocaching is something we’ve done with our kids since they were young! Let us help you understand what it is, and we’ll guarantee you’ll love it as much as your kids do. 

ge·o·cach·ing — ˈjēōˌkaSHiNG 

It occurred to us one day while speaking with someone that many people still don’t know what this incredibly fun activity is. And the most fun part is, in these unpredictable times of 2020 and 2021, you can absolutely get out and do this while social distancing. 

What is Geocaching?

“Geocaching is a real-world, outdoor treasure hunting game using GPS-enabled devices (or phone – though I have confirmed the phone is not as accurate and can make this harder). Participants navigate to a specific set of GPS coordinates and then attempt to find the geocache (container) hidden at that location.” There are millions of geocaches hidden around the world—there are probably some near you right now. You probably walk right by them every day. Which is the object of this! They are hidden and unless you know they are there, they are not seen. Sometimes under a rock, inside a tree, under a bush, inside a bird feeder, or under a bridge. The possibilities are endless. 

How We Got Started

We started Geocaching when our youngest daughter was about 5 (she is 24 now). Our girls didn’t spend much time in front of the TV, and video games were pretty expensive. I (Stacy) was a stay-at-home mom for 12 years, and funds were limited, so we learned about Geocaching. A free worldwide scavenger hunt. Who doesn’t like a scavenger hunt? It gets you outside exploring new and different areas. With the technology the way it is today, it’s gotten much easier for families to join, and yet so many of our friends look at us funny when we say we went Geocaching for the afternoon. 

More Information

There is a lot of information out there about this fun activity, but basically, you sign up on their website. It’s free, but they do have a $30-a-year premium membership you can purchase. Which gets you even more caches in your area. You can download their free app on all phones and enter your current location and search. Try it … just for fun, to see how many caches are in your area! Chose any geocache from the list and get information on that cache. If you want to search for it, you would enter into your GPS device the location coordinates, and your handheld GPS (or phone) will lead you to the cache. Our family likes medium, large or extra-large caches. These are typically Tupperware containers or ammo boxes full of “stuff” If you take something, the rule is to put something inside. There is always a logbook to sign and date, and make sure you “log our find” so the owner of the cache knows who was there. You physically sign the book and then log your find electronically online. 

What Are Trackables?

aka: “Travel Bugs” A trackable is a sort of physical geocaching “game piece.” You will often find them in geocaches. Each Trackable is etched with a unique code that can be used to log its movements on Geocaching.com as it travels in the real world. Some of these items have traveled hundreds of thousands of miles thanks to geocachers who move them from cache to cache! 

They can be coins, dog tag types, or connected to a particular item like a key chain, small stuffed animal, etc. These are our favorites. Because we traveled so much in the military, we loved to take them from one state and move them to another.

Here are a few supplies we have. But really, just keeping a bin of fun little items is a great way to share the surprise!

I could go on and on about Geocaching, but there is much more information online for you. Go to www.geocaching.com to find out more. Get your kids involved! My kids are 33 and 24 and we still involve them in this fun outside activity. Now my oldest is a mom herself and loves Geocaching and soon my granddaughter will be running around looking for fun caches everywhere!

So get out! Download the free app on your phone and enjoy your time exploring!

Here are some more fun blog posts we think you’ll love!

So – You’re shopping on Amazon? I mean, who doesn’t, right? Please consider using our link. It doesn’t cost you anything extra, and it gives us a few extra pennies. Click below to use our link and then just shop like normal. Don’t forget ~ check out within 24 hours, so we get credit! Thank you!! It really means a lot to us!

Thank you for stopping by our little corner of the internet! We truly appreciate each and every person who takes the time to read our blogs. We’re honored you spent the last few minutes with us!  If you aren’t signed up to follow us, please do! You’ll be notified of our new blogs when they go up. 

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Off the Beaten Path Series, Travel Destinations & Stories

Off the Beaten Path in New Hampshire. Our Top Favorites!

UPDATED IN 2022As full-time RV’ers, we travel and see a lot. This is part of our Opting Out of Normal series where we explore the “Off the Beaten Path” of every state. We love the big popular stuff like everyone else, but there is just something incredible about discovering something unique, different, and maybe a little “off the beaten path”. We certainly can’t explore them all, but we’d love you to include your favorites below too. Each series will include at least 1 epic boondocking area, some complete with pictures, and all with GPS coordinates.

When traveling to New Hampshire, you definitely want to explore the more popular places, because in this small state, even those popular things are still unique and on those roads less traveled. Check out The Lost River Gorge and take a train ride on the Conway Railroad.

The Basin

This is located in Franconia Notch State Park in Lincoln. The Basin, a 30-foot-wide, 15-foot-deep bowl hewn from a torrent of rushing water pouring down the face of granite cliffs, is a geological masterpiece. Dating back to the Ice Age. Parking is accessible in both directions via exit 34A off I-93. A gentle, paved hike leads from the parking lot to The Basin itself. Dog friendly. There are 2 viewing areas. One is handicap accessible. The walk to the basin is less than 10 minutes and there is a parking area. Don’t miss the amazing Baby Flume waterfall as well. These are natural waterfalls created by the rushing waters of the Pemigewasset.

More incredible pictures from Franconia Notch State Park

Sculptured Rocks – Hebron

This narrow canyon has been carved by the river over thousands of years into spectacular and strange formations. A short walk from a back road near Newfound Lake, the wonders of the Sculptured Rocks geological site is not obviously apparent.

However, once standing next to the little canyon or atop the short bridge across, you can see the incredible shapes the river has carved in the rocks. After crossing the bridge, there are many trails to explore. Leave plenty of time as it’s definitely hard to stop taking pictures! There’s a sign next to the road and plenty of parking. On the way, there is one of the most beautiful lakes in New Hampshire, Newfound Lake. Make sure to save some time to visit this too!

Ruggles Mine, Grafton

Ruggles Mine State Park

(Update! I was told this place had closed so I did some research. It looks like there are new owners who plan to open it back up to the public at some point, and also I found several organizations who are doing “field trip” type tours here. If you’re interested, do some research and try not to miss this!). This place is just not something you can even describe. You have to see it! I see there are some great YouTube videos out there that people have done, so if you find this fascinating, make sure you watch some of those videos. At Ruggles Mine, you could quite literally find a hidden gem, since the mine is full of over 150 types of minerals. Even if you don’t, you’ll enjoy the stunning scenery. During certain times the floor of the mine will gather water, and that makes it even more scenic. 

Madame Sherri’s Castle

These are just ruins now, which we love to explore too. But once these ruins were the elaborate house where the enigmatic costume designer threw glamorous parties for New York’s theatrical elite. In New York, Madame Sherri made a name for herself designing elaborate costumes for Broadway productions, most notably the Ziegfeld Follies. After her husband’s death, she decided to build a unique structure in the woods of Chesterfield, New Hampshire, to hold parties for her theater friends.

TIP: The castle is near the entrance to the Madame Sherri Forest on Gulf Road. You’ll have to drive deep into the woods on dirt and stone roads, which may make you question whether you missed a turn. While the structures seem stable, be careful, as there are no handrails on the steps.

America’s Stonehenge, Salem

This mysterious man-made site features walls, chambers, and ceremonial sites that are over 4,000 years old! Some say that this is the oldest man-made construction in the U.S. I think the only downfall to this was the cost. If you’re a family going to see this, it’s not cheap. It was $12 per adult, children were $7.50 (under 5 were free). Really amazing history, but the cost seemed high to me! This is a unique, and different thing to see, but I don’t know that I’d go out of my way to see it. If you’re in the area, check it out!

Parkers Pancakes & Maple Barn

Located in Mason, NH. No visit to NH would be complete without some pancakes and homemade syrup! Located in Mason, Parker’s serves up pumpkin pancakes and maple coffee. The family business also runs a Sugar House and the Corn Crib Gift Shop. It’s a perfect way to spend the afternoon. 

Garwin Falls

Located in Wilton. Super short walk of just 0.1 miles one-way to upper falls; 0.25 miles one-way to the base of the main falls. If you’ve read any of my blogs before, you know that waterfalls are my happy place.

WOW! Just look at these falls!

I’ve said it before, they are the place where I feel the most at peace with everything around me. It’s where I feel centered and clear-minded. This is a beautiful short, easy walk and well worth the few minutes to get to the falls. Take your lunch! Enjoy a whole afternoon here. It’s really one of those off-the-beaten-path places you won’t regret. 

Story Land

(Sorry … no pictures of this place) Story Land is a theme park located in Glen, New Hampshire. In the few years prior to opening, the founders, Bob and Ruth Morrell had purchased a large number of dolls from Germany based on storybook characters. Unfortunately, I have had the fear of dolls passed up to me. Yes, UP! Our youngest daughter has a huge fear of dolls and so raising her made me look at them as a little more creepy than I had before having her, and therefore, I just don’t put myself in places where there are dolls. BUT with that being said, it’s super fun for kids, AND you get to stay in your RV in the parking lot FREE for a night or two. 

Here are a few other blogs we think you’ll love!

Boondocking

  1. Story Land Parking Lot (see above)
  2. Rochester Park & Ride – These seem to be a “thing” in NH. And at most you can spend the night at. Sadly, NH doesn’t seem to have a whole lot of disbursed camping, but these park and rides are actually pretty ok! This is big rig friendly, and GPS: 43.292794, -71.000173. 
  3. Walmart – any of them.

So – You’re shopping on Amazon? I mean who doesn’t, right? Please consider using our link. It doesn’t cost you anything extra, and it gives us a few extra pennies. Click below to use our link and then just shop like normal. Don’t forget ~ check out within 24 hours so we get credit! Thank you!! It really means a lot to us!

Thank you for stopping by our little corner of the internet! We truly appreciate each and every person who takes the time to read our blogs. We’re honored you spent the last few minutes with us!  If you aren’t signed up to follow us, please do! You’ll be notified of our new blogs when they go up. 

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Off the Beaten Path Series, Travel Destinations & Stories

Off the Beaten Path in Kansas. Our Top Hidden Gems!

As full-time RV’ers, we travel and see a lot. This is part of our Opting Out of Normal series where we explore the “Off the Beaten Path” of every state. We love the big popular stuff like everyone else, but there is just something incredible about discovering something unique, different, and maybe a little “off the beaten path”. We certainly can’t explore them all, but we’d love you to include your favorites below too. Each blog post will have a link to our favorite free camping areas! Some will include pictures and all will include GPS coordinates and information.

I think everything in Kansas qualifies as “off the beaten path” since it’s such a rural, and unique state in itself. Don’t you think? Don’t let that fool you though! My gosh, there are some beautiful things to see in Kansas! Here are our picks. And I promise not to make a Toto reference. 

Rock City

Rock City is a park located on hillsides overlooking the Solomon River in Ottawa County, Kansas. It’s just over 3 miles south of Minneapolis, Kansas. Rock City claims that there is no place else in the world with so many huge concretions. I think it’s eerie and fascinating. Rock City does have a very small admission fee of about $3 or $4. Well worth it. 

Table Mound Hiking Trail

This is an out and back hike, of just under 3 miles one way. If you choose not to do the whole thing, you are still going to see some fascinating views.

From scenic overlooks to a drop-down into a crack in the rocks. This isn’t a super hard hike but there are some rock scrambles. You’re going to see some pretty amazing rock formations on this hike.

Slide Cave – Kanopolis State Park

This entire state park is worth seeing. But definitely check out some of the caves in the park. 

Geary Lake Falls – Junction City, Kansas

Bet you didn’t know there were waterfalls in Kansas.

There are actually quite a few. A secret hideaway for those hot summer days, this waterfall is only active after a bit of rain. There are few waterfalls in Kansas. And this one is not publicized. On most days you can take in the waterfall all for yourself.

Cedar Bluff Reservoir

Located in Ransom, KS. Incredible views! Atop the bluff, visitors can see for miles in all directions and can walk right to the edge of the bluff. It’s quite the drop to the shoreline below.

There is a small circle turnaround at the top of the bluff for parking. The walk to the edge of the bluff is very short and I think accessible by wheelchair. Also, the state park nearby offers excellent camping, both for RVs and tents alike, whether for group or solo excursions. Well worth a quick stop!!

Castle Rock Badlands

Just about an hour away from the below Monument Rocks National Landmark. We highly recommend this area, but it is very fragile. Please be respectful and careful! A little history – In 2001, a large portion of the tallest spire fell after a thunderstorm, taking ten feet off the overall height.

All that remains of the fourth spire is a stub on the west end. The wind and rain that formed this geological wonder are still eroding today. Human interaction has accelerated the process as well. Just south of Castle Rock are the Castle Rock Badlands. The badlands consist of steep crevices and hoodoos leading off a large ridge. They are fragile as well, with one of the hoodoos known as Cobra Rock collapsing in 1998. Like Castle Rock and nearby Monument Rocks, the Badlands are comprised of Niobrara Chalk and shale.

Monument Rocks National Landmark

I’ve had some people tell me this isn’t such a hidden gem in Kansas. I disagree, but I am also not a local. So I’m including it. Please don’t climb on or write on these amazing rocks. We’d love to have this available for everyone to see. Please Note: Monument Rocks is located on private property. The owners graciously allow any and all to come to visit this wonderful landmark. Near Oakley, Kansas, Monument Rocks are large chalk formations that stand up to 70 feet high and look as though they were arranged by human hands. From US Route 83 south of Oakley, turn east onto Jayhawk Road at the Monument Rocks sign, go 4 miles east, then 2 miles south on Gove County Roads 14 and 16. These roads for the most are gravel, but good.

Here are some more blogs we think you’ll love!

Thank you for coming and reading our favorite hidden gems in Kansas. Have you explored Kansas? Did you find a fun, hidden gem of your own? We’d love to hear about it! Please leave your comments below.

Looking for the best free camping in Kansas? Here’s a link to some great boondocking locations we found!

So – You’re shopping on Amazon? I mean who doesn’t, right? Please consider using our link. It doesn’t cost you anything extra, and it gives us a few extra pennies. Click below to use our link and then just shop like normal. Don’t forget ~ check out within 24 hours so we get credit! Thank you!! It really means a lot to us!

Boondocking / Dry Camping, Off the Beaten Path Series, Travel Destinations & Stories

Off the Beaten Path in Washington. Our Top Hidden Gems!

As full-time RV’ers, we travel and see a lot. This is part of our Opting Out of Normal series where we explore the “Off the Beaten Path” of every state. We love the big popular stuff like everyone else, but there is just something incredible about discovering something unique, and different. Taking that road less traveled has been our favorite way to travel. We certainly can’t explore them all, but we’d love you to include your favorites below too. Each blog post will include a link to the free camping areas we loved so much. complete with pictures and GPS coordinates. You definitely have to visit popular places like Olympic National Park and Mount Rainier National Park while in Washington. But we have some unique, off-the-beaten-path experiences you might want to check out too. 

Deception Pass

We really love State Parks. Most are just completely overlooked, unpopulated, and amazing. Deception Pass State Park is beautiful! Highly recommend checking it out. If beaches are your thing, you’ve hit the jackpot! You can also take a whale watching tour. Absolutely incredible.

Maryhill Museum and Stonehenge

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An odd museum and Stonehenge replica in rural Washington State. Sam Hill was a Quaker and used his money to organize and fund a Quaker utopian community on the banks of the Columbia River in the early 1900s. Unfortunately, no Quakers besides Hill ever moved there and his utopian vision failed after a few short years. Nonetheless, Hill continued with the construction of a French Mansion on a cliff overlooking the Columbia River. From Portland, Oregon, take I-84 east through the Columbia River Gorge for about 70 miles. Cross the river at The Dalles (the pink bridge) and continue east on state route 14 for another 20 miles

Stonehenge in Washington

Palouse Falls

Located in Lacrosse. Unless you know what they’re looking for, hikers are unlikely to simply stumble upon the nearly hidden Palouse Falls. This is a 1.2-mile loop trail hike, pretty easy. You can actually see the falls from the parking area if you don’t want to do the hike.

The state park offers three distinct views of the falls. The lower viewpoint provides a direct view; it is reached by a set of steps from the main day-use area adjacent to the parking lot. The second, at the end of a paved interpretive path, tells the story of the secluded canyon. Both the interpretive path and gravel secondary parking area lead to the third and highest viewpoint, the Fryxell Overlook, offering panoramic views of the falls and Palouse River Canyon. Don’t miss this! It’s awesome!

Beacon Rock

Located in Stevenson – A truly unique experience to do. The location is on State Route 14 about 35 miles East of Vancouver.

Today, visitors of Beacon Rock State Park use the unique trail system to easily traverse the rock’s steep ledges to its peak overlooking the Columbia River Gorge.  The rock is also open for climbing year-round.

Gravity Hill

Have you seen or experienced these across America? While traveling we’ve realized there are several places in the US that have a gravity hill phenomenon. This gravity-defying road is not easy to find. Located on a stretch of North Crosby Road about 10-15 miles north of Prosser, the road’s just down the street from an old (said to be haunted) grain elevator. Luckily, there’s a start line painted on the pavement so you’ll know where it is.

Snoqualmie Falls

Snoqualmie is a city next to Snoqualmie Falls in King County, Washington. It is twenty-five miles east of Seattle. Who knew you could be so close to a city and see this? 

If you’re in Seattle, definitely check out the Center of the Universe Sign. No one has been able to determine if this is actually the center of the universe, so the sign stays. Just a fun thing to see. 

Speaking of Seattle! Did you see our blog about our visit to Seattle? We were lucky enough to be able to hang out in a friend’s yard with full hook-ups in our RV! I know you’re here to see the quiet hidden gems in Washington, but if you wanted to venture to the more popular things, check out our Seattle blog post here!

The Nutty Narrows Bridge

Do you like squirrels? Yes, I said Squirrels! The Nutty Narrows Bridge in Longview was constructed in 1963 by a local builder, the late Amos Peters, to give squirrels a way to cross Olympia Way, a busy Longview, Washington, thoroughfare, without getting flattened by passing cars.

Here are some other blogs we think you’ll love!

Click the button below to see our best places for RV camping in Washington.

Thank you for checking out our little corner of the internet. There is so much beauty in Washington. Please share your hidden gems with us! We’d love to hear from you!

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Off the Beaten Path Series

Off the Beaten Path in Montana – Our Top Hidden Gems in Montana!

As full-time RV’ers, we travel and see a lot. This is part of our Opting Out of Normal series where we explore the “Off the Beaten Path” of every state.  Of course, we love the big popular stuff like everyone else, but there is just something incredible about discovering something unique and different to see as well. We certainly can’t explore them all, but we’d love you to include your favorites below too. We live our name – Opting Out of Normal.

Summer is the perfect time to visit Montana. It gets a little warm in Montana, but most days are pleasant and comfortable.


Kootenai Falls & Swinging Bridge

Located between Libby and Troy, (mile marker 21) the swinging bridge is only about half a mile from the parking area located on Highway 2.

Swinging Bridge Libby Montana

There is a place to eat lunch and bathrooms too. It’s just downstream from Kootenai Falls, the bridge offers access to the other side of the Kootenai River, offering a better view of the falls and connecting to multiple hiking paths. Fun Fact: The bridge was featured in the hit movie, The River Wild. Fun Fact #2: Kayakers can use the bridge to gain access to the famous Super Hole and other river access points.

Garnet Ghost Town

Hidden high in the Garnet Mountain Range east of Missoula. This was one of the coolest things we saw in Montana. The history of this little town is unbelievable.

For a town built that was never intended to last, this is Montana’s most intact ghost town. The miners were more interested in collecting the riches below ground than building above. As a result, buildings grew quickly, most lacking foundations. They were small and easy to heat. Yet, a century after Garnet emerged, remnants of the town stand. If you do nothing else on this list, definitely explore this!

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The Boiling River

Boiling River flows into the Gardner River and is as natural as it gets.  Just two miles from Yellowstone National Park’s North gate. The hot water and the cool water flow together, meeting in small, stone pools that create natural hot tubs for soaking.

Boiling River

The water flowing from Mammoth Hot Springs is very hot, so be careful. This is public land, and free to use as long as you follow the posted rules. 

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The Ringing Rocks

This place is a crazy phenomenon in my opinion. I’ve seen piles of rocks that don’t “ring”, so these just don’t make sense to me, but it’s fascinating to go see. Pack some hammers for this! Different types, and sizes. You’ll figure it out when you get there! The Ringing Rocks near Butte ring melodically when tapped gently with a hammer. Some sound completely hollow.

Ringing Rocks, near Butte

This pile of rocks exists as part of the edge of the Boulder Batholith, a geological formation that reaches from Helena to Dillon, covering roughly 1,900 square miles. The rock’s composition and connection patterns create the condition that causes the rocks to ring when struck. Scientists say that once removed from the formation, the rocks no longer ring. Just go check this out! It’s really fun for kids too!  Beware though, the roads to reach the rocks are often treacherous.

Havre Beneath the Streets

This is really bizarre and we really love stuff like this! It’s a little on the shady side when you do the Havre Beneath the Streets underground tour. When a fire almost decimated the town in 1904, adaptable business owners moved underground.

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Some shops opened in their basements, and together, they created a series of tunnels that stretched about a six-block radius. They carried on business as usual during the rebuilding of the town above-ground. There is a barbershop, a general store, a saloon, a bordello, and others. If you’re looking for unique, definitely put this one on your list.

Jim’s Horn House

Ready for this one? Ha! This is a collection of 16,000 antlers crammed beautifully into a small shed. It’s actually very beautifully displayed. Art!! For the last six decades, Jim’s favorite pastime has been to hike out into the Montana backcountry, braving the elements, for the sole purpose of picking up thousands of pairs of stray antlers.

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Since starting his collection as a 10-year-old boy, the “Antler Man” has amassed a grand total of 16,000 antlers, all of which are on display in one well-lit shed in Three Forks, Montana. His story is absolutely fascinating and touching. I won’t spoil it! If you’re lucky enough to get a tour, you’ll be able to hear his story firsthand. 

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Know Before You Go: Jim isn’t open as a business. But he does love to share his collection with you, but you must email him (yes, I swear, this is legitimate) and he will give you his address if he’s able to give you a tour. His email is 2jd3law4@gmail.com

Holland Lake

Holland Lake is a small glacier lake in the Flathead Valley National Forest. Yes! this picture is mine and it’s what we saw most days if we woke up early enough. Just gorgeous! We were lucky enough to work here over the summer last year as workampers. (If you would like to read our workamping blog, click here) It is a paid campground with no hookups, but oh the lake! Just wow!

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And the hiking as well is just something completely worth the stay. There is a beautiful, short hike to the waterfalls, and you can also take a longer hike up to Upper Holland Lake. But don’t go too early, as Upper Holland Lake is frozen until the middle of June. We normally are all about free camping and boondocking but I had to include this beautiful out of the way area on our list. It’s worth a stop! There is a day-use area if you just want to enjoy it for the day and take a hike from there. You may not be able to get into Holland Lake to camp (it’s off the beaten path, but it’s a very busy campground for the locals who usually head from Helena every summer). But, there is boondocking right next to Holland Lake (walking distance even) called Owl Creek.

Want to check out all our favorite boondocking locations in Montana? Click the button below for lots of great boondocking and paid campground information.

Morrell Falls

This might not be an “off the beaten path” place, but we hiked up to Morrell Falls and it’s worth a trip! The water that comes over the top of these falls is so intense, that it was hard to get pictures because as soon as we lifted our camera, it would be full of mist. We hiked in, sat in the beautiful spray of the water, ate lunch, and enjoyed a very easy hike back out.

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Here are some more of our travel blogs we think you’ll love!

Thank you for coming to our little corner of the internet. We hope you found some fun things to see and explore. We’d love to hear from you! Where are your favorite hidden gems in Montana?

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Boondocking / Dry Camping, Off the Beaten Path Series, Travel Destinations & Stories

Off the Beaten Path in Michigan. Top Hidden Gems We Found in Michigan!

If this is your first time here – WELCOME! If not, welcome back!! As full-time RV’ers, we travel and see a lot. This is part of our Opting Out of Normal series where we explore the hidden treasures in every state. We love the big popular attractions like everyone else, but there is just something incredible about discovering something unique, different, and taking the road less traveled. We certainly can’t explore them all, but we’d love you to share your own off-the-beaten-path stories. Each series will include a link to our favorite free camping areas, along with other RV camping we’ve done in the state

Crisp Point Lighthouse

This is a beautiful lighthouse to visit, but consider yourself forewarned, the road to get there is like no other we’ve traveled. When they sell a t-shirt in the gift shop that says “I survived the road to Crisp Point Lighthouse”, they aren’t kidding! We did it in a dually, so I know everyone can do it, but it is long and tedious, but worth the sights (and you might actually want to buy a t-shirt when you get there). A lot of people travel there on a side by side or off-road toys. We actually visited several lighthouses on the “lighthouse tour”. You can pick up a guide at the visitors center. Makes for a fun “truck hike” day. YES … this funny (funny because it turned out good) sign is actually on the road in! Let’s hear it for Girl Scout Cookies saving lives!!! 

The Tridge – Midland MI

Located in Chippewassee Park, this isn’t the only triple bridge in Michigan, but if you’re near the area, it’s a beautiful walk, and something pretty unique. There is also a farmers market, a skate park and a dog park if you’re interested. 

Crystal Coaster Alpine Slide

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Located in Thompsonville. It’s basically a huge water slide without the water. You take a chair lift to the top of the mountain and jump on a specialized sled to ride one of the two slides that are each 1,700 feet long. Make sure to check dates because the slide is only open seasonally.

Electric Forest

I’m adding this because it’s on my bucket list. We have not gone here (yet). But highly recommend at least checking it out. It looks really amazing and fun! Click here for information. 

Most everyone knows about the Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore. It’s not an “off the beaten path” choice, but if you go to Michigan, DON’T MISS IT!!! It’s a breathtaking but very popular tourist place. We went! We loved it, and if you have any questions, let me know. The hiking and kayaking are amazing there!!  I did want to mention that once or twice a year, if you’re lucky, the wind is blowing just right and the garnet in the rocks washes up on shore and causes the sand to turn a vibrant pink. It only lasts a couple of hours to a couple of days. We were lucky enough to catch it! Go into the visitors center and ask about it. 

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Ann Arbor’s Fairy Doors

We find this a little creepy, (we like this kind of stuff Ha!) and quite entertaining and interesting. Have you heard the story behind these?  You can actually pick up a tour brochure to show you where all the fairy doors are. Pretty creative! 

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Here’s a little history I found: “In 1993, While Jonathan B. Wright was renovating his century-old home, his young daughters made a delightful discovery: itty, bitty, six-inch doors scattered throughout the space. When opened, there were tiny railings inside that led to other miniature doors. There were even windows springing up, where lights inside would magically turn on and off. By 2005, Jonathan had become a full-fledged Fairyologist, documenting the little doors that were now springing up all around town – obviously, they were fairies, what else could they be? His website has documentation of over two dozen doors from these “urban fairies.” 

Blooming Mystical Lavender Labyrinth

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Who knew? This is on a farm in Shelby Michigan, called Cherry Point Farm and Market. The fruit and farm market has been in operation since 1961. In 2001, owner Barbara Bull started work on a lavender labyrinth, which can be seen on Google Earth. Don’t forget the amazing cherry pie and other fantastic fruits and homemade yummy things from this farm and market. 

Manistique Boardwalk and River Walk

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The Boardwalk runs down the Lake Michigan shore in the town of Manistique. Go for an early morning walk or take an afternoon and picnic in the park. You can view the Manistique Lighthouse or ships passing by. It is a wonderful way to spend a day. You can spend as much or as little time there. It’s really beautiful to walk out on the jetty to the lighthouse. As you can see from the picture, the sunsets are incredible. Highly recommend early Fall if you’re wanting a more peaceful, quiet time. 

Tahquamenon Falls State Park

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This doesn’t fall into a typical off-the-beaten-path place, but I just had to mention it. We visited this area in September on a weekday. It was almost empty! We actually went twice in one day. (We wanted to get some pictures later in the day.) TIP: Paradise is actually a very small, very expensive little town. We made the mistake of running out of propane and having to fill up there. It was the highest propane cost we’ve ever paid. So gas up, fill your propane tanks, and arrive with everything you need or you’ll be paying extremely high prices there. 

Kayaking

Want to do some Kayaking (one of our favorite things to do) Here are two of our top picks (other than the Pictured Rocks National Seashore area which is not an Off the Beaten Path area)

Bete Grise Sea Arch

Bete Grise

Bete Grise is a nature preserve on Keweenaw Peninsula, in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. A quiet and scenic kayaking destination on the Keweenaw Peninsula’s southern shores. The Bete Grise Bay is an amazing destination on its own.  There are miles of shoreline and waterfalls. Make a point to check out Keweenaw Historical Ruins too!

TIP: Launch your kayak or canoe from the Bete Gris Beach and paddle east, keeping the shoreline on your left side. After a couple of miles, natural rock sea stacks and sea arches rise from the shockingly clear water of Lake Superior. You can float through the arch and hang out in the shade. Please watch the weather. Lake Superior can be brutal in a kayak!

Turnip Rock

So, I was thinking this was a pretty popular thing to do. But when I started talking to people last year, no one had heard of it.

So we’re including it on our list. This unique rock formation is a favorite destination of those kayaking in Lake Huron, as it’s only accessible by water. The land on Turnip Rock is privately owned but you can still access this by water (kayak, boat, etc) Another option is to wait for Lake Huron to freeze and walk your way out to Turnip Rock.

Hope you enjoyed the ideas! Thank you so much for visiting our little corner of the internet. We would love to hear what you find “off the beaten path” in Michigan. 

Looking for the best boondocking or paid campgrounds to stay in while you’re traveling in Michigan? Check out our ever-changing, always updating list! Click the button below to see our best RV Camping in Michigan!

So – You’re shopping on Amazon? I mean who doesn’t, right? Please consider using our link. It doesn’t cost you anything extra, and it gives us a few extra pennies. Click below to use our link and then just shop like normal. Don’t forget ~ check out within 24 hours so we get credit! Thank you!! It means a lot to us!

Here are some of our top blogs we think you’ll love!

Thank you for checking out our little corner of the internet! We appreciate each and every one of you! We’d love to hear from you!

Off the Beaten Path Series, Small Footprint ~ Big Impressions, Travel Destinations & Stories

Crossing the Mississippi in 21 Steps. Exploring the Mississippi Headwaters.

Did you know?

The Mississippi Headwaters is actually in the state of Minnesota?

There is a Mississippi Headwaters State Park … and that is NOT where the Mississippi Headwaters is really located? 

These are geography mishaps in my book. Ha!

Itasca State Park – Minnesota

We came upon this area purely by mistake, and we think it’s such a great area, that we wanted to share the information. 

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Their visitors center is set up really well, with a lot of historical signs to read. Justin loves history! There is a small entrance fee to the park of $7. It’s all self-service at a small kiosk at the front. There is a campground inside the park as well. When we were there it was $31 per night. We are more into boondocking (disbursed / Free camping) and usually do not stay in paid campgrounds, but from what we saw it looked pretty nice. We weren’t allowed beyond a certain point since we weren’t camping there.

The walk from the visitors center to the Mississippi Headwaters is only 800 feet. This is wheelchair accessible and easy. There are some longer hikes and a lot of short hikes through their nature trails.

Live Cam!

Click Here to Visit the Live Webcam

Fire Tower Hike

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If you’re able to do longer hikes, we highly recommend the 1-mile round trip hike to the fire tower. The sign just below the tower is quite comical, and I won’t ruin the chuckle by posting a picture of it. See for yourself! We climbed to the top and the views are breathtaking. You are completely caged in at the top so don’t worry!

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We spent the entire day driving around, hiking short trails, and enjoying the beautiful fall weather. 

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So – You’re shopping on Amazon? I mean who doesn’t, right? Please consider using our link. It doesn’t cost you anything extra, and it gives us a few extra pennies. Click below to use our link and then just shop like normal. Don’t forget ~ check out within 24 hours so we get credit! Thank you!! It really means a lot to us!

Thank you for visiting our little corner of the internet. We hope you find information and value in our content. Here are some more blogs we think you’ll love!

Off the Beaten Path Series

Off the Beaten Path in Ohio. The Top Hidden Gems in Ohio.

As full-time RV’ers, we travel and see a lot. We’re on our 4th year traveling around the country and seeking out the unique and different things to see and do! This is part of our Opting Out of Normal series where we explore the “Off the Beaten Path” of every state. We love the big popular stuff like everyone else, but there is just something incredible about discovering something unique, different, and taking those roads less traveled. We certainly can’t explore them all, but we’d love you to include your favorites below too. Each blog post will include a link to our amazing boondocking locations, plus any paid or membership locations we stayed while in Ohio.

Fun Fact: Did you know Ohio is home to the largest rubber stamp? Or maybe you like pencil sharpeners! If so, make your way over to the pencil sharpener museum. Who knew?

Hocking Hills State Park – Logan

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Before visiting Hocking Hills State Park, I had never heard of it. As we’ve said in so many of our blogs, State Parks are just so overlooked for their bigger, more popular National Parks. Hocking Hills State Park was by far on our very topmost liked list so far. Of course, we’ve only traveled for just over three years now, so there is a lot to see. Hocking Hills State Park is home to more waterfalls in a small area than I had ever seen. As we walked through the state park, the movie The Hobbit came to mind. It’s very magical and mystical looking. People don’t believe the pictures are from an Ohio park, but many who know of this incredible landscape consider it the most beautiful land in the Midwest. Striking rock formations speckle the park, which is filled with gorges and caves waiting to be explored. Please check out our video below for a little more information.

Piatt Castles

Since you’re visiting Hocking Hills, make sure you visit Piatt Castles in Logan County. We just truly enjoy the different and unique, and the history behind them. The land was owned by Benjamin and Elizabeth Piatt who moved there with their children from Cincinnati. They had great respect for nature and the valley in which Piatt Castles is located, much as the original Ohio inhabitants had, and made the relocation permanent. The two Piatt homes were modeled after castles and lived in by two of their children who stayed on at the family estate, and are now open to the public as a museum.

Crystal Cave

Have an extra 15 minutes, and want to do something epic? Check out Crystal Cave in Put-In-Bay, Ohio.

This is the world’s largest geode. This “cave” can be viewed in less than 15 minutes, and yes, it’s that small. But for what you’re seeing, it’s huge! The geode was discovered in 1887, by workers digging a well for a winery. Things like this make me wonder what other untouched gems are still to be discovered — or not!

Moonville Tunnel – McArthur 

Deep within the woods near Lake Hope State Park, the Moonville Tunnel is one of the few reminders of the small mining town of Moonville which has otherwise disappeared from the map. Justin and I love the history of the old mining towns, though most of the stories didn’t end well. It’s still a neat (and sad) part of our history. Directions: GPS: 39.31006, -82.32434 – Stop before the metal bridge on the roadway and park in the gravel pull off. This is Ohio Division of Forestry property and there are unmarked trails at the pull off. Follow the trail by the boulder along the edge of Raccoon Creek. It will wind around through the old town of Moonville (nothing left but a few stones and a couple of wells) until you climb a small hill to the railroad and tunnel. If you go past the bridge, you can see the tunnel but there is no bridge to cross the creek this way.

Frozen Cleveland Lighthouse

Ok, so Cleveland isn’t exactly a hidden gem, but I had never heard of this frozen lighthouse until I was doing some research.

This amazing lighthouse in Cleveland that is placed so close to Lake Erie that a bizarre weather phenomenon takes place. Also, Curiously, over the 105 years, the lighthouse has developed a slight tilt to the right, and the tilt is visible from the shore if you look carefully.

Kelley’s Island Glacial Grooves – Kelleys Island

The glacial grooves on the north side of Kelleys Island are the largest and most easily accessible glacial grooves in the world. They were scoured into solid limestone bedrock about 18,000 years ago by the great ice sheet that covered part of North America. Directions: It is on the north side of the island. However, the Island is only accessible by ferry (which is part of the fun). 

Kelley’s Island Winery Ruins

If you go to Kelley’s Island, there are a few things to see here. Don’t miss the two ruined wineries, which are still standing today. You can get to Kelleys Island from Marblehead most of the year. The ferry ride takes about 30 minutes. The best time to visit is mid-May to October. Golf carts are available for rent at the ferry station.

Mushroom House

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There are some really … Ummm … let’s call them “UNIQUE” houses in Ohio. We really like houses that were constructed by someone with a kind of odd or different vision. They make us think and wonder about the thought process involved. Seriously, who wakes up one morning and says “my dream is to build a house that looks like a mushroom”? Well, architecture professor Terry Brown did. Between 1992 and 2006, the late Brown used warped shingles and oddly wrapping staircases to give his one-bedroom home on the corner of Erie and Tarpis Ave. a look like no other. Unfortunately Brown passed away in 2008, but the Mushroom House remains a beloved landmark in the neighborhood and doesn’t look to be wilting any time soon. Address: 3518 Tarpis Ave, Cincinnati, OH – I know I don’t have to tell any of my readers, but please be respectful. This is a privately owned home. 

Check out the Franklin Castle too! It’s more popular, but a really cool place to visit too!

Hillandale Bridge – Euclid

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This abandoned bridge to nowhere stands secluded in the woods of a Cleveland suburb. Perched atop a hill on an old brick road in Euclid, Ohio, near a city park of the same name, lies a 1920s bridge that has stood the test of time, but exists as a bridge to nowhere. Most people don’t know the story behind Cleveland’s abandoned bridge to nowhere. The bridge is starting to show its age, so watch out for several holes that have crumbled out of the pavement and for cement railing sections that have fallen down into the creek below. Along the bridge and the old brick road leading to it are old fixtures and remnants of streetlights as well. To get to the bridge, park within the Hillandale Park parking lot and walk up on the brick road. The bridge is a small distance up the path – just be certain not to walk up the driveway of the one private residence that exists up the hill.

Garden of Constants

Ok, this is fun!! If you’re visiting Columbus, you gotta take a half hour and just visit this unique place!

Located on the beautiful campus of Ohio State University, these massive, colorful numbers bring a whimsical air to the lawn outside the engineering building. They’ve stood there since 1994. If you’re a student, or maybe a parent of a student, this might not be something unique, but we found it super cool. Still … I have to say “Go WVU Mountaineers”.

Porter Creek Bridge Ruins – Bay Village

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The scenic remains of an old rail bridge. In the age before automobiles or air travel, the people of northern Ohio traveled on a network of interurban trolley lines known as the Lake Shore Electric Railroad. The rail system connected Cleveland to Toledo, and towns such as Fremont and Sandusky in between. This is just something to see if you’re passing through this area. I love old ruins like this. Can you imagine living back in these days? Really thought-provoking.  Directions: Getting to the bridge piers and remnants is extremely easy. Park at the Lake Erie Nature & Science Center located on Porter Creek Road in Bay Village. Follow the bicycle path north along the road until the path dips down below the bridge piers. To cross the creek to the other side, continue north on the bicycle path, cross the bridge over the creek, and cross to the west side of the road. Paths lead back along the creek towards the bridge piers deeper into the woods.

Have you seen some special, hidden gems you’d love to share with us? We’d love to hear from you!

Have you seen some of our other blog posts?

Looking for the best places to camp in your RV in Ohio? We’ll share our amazing boondocking, paid camping areas and membership suggestions and reviews. Click the link below for our RV Camping in Ohio blog.

So – You’re shopping on Amazon? I mean who doesn’t, right? Please consider using our link. It doesn’t cost you anything extra, and it gives us a few extra pennies. Click below to use our link and then just shop like normal. Don’t forget ~ check out within 24 hours so we get credit! Thank you!! It really means a lot to us!

Thank you for visiting our blog. We appreciate each and every one of you and hope to meet you out on the road someday!